Want to have a more accurate barrel for your rifle?

 

First things first - find the most skilled machinist in town. A gunsmith known to have a knack for chambering barrels on benchrest rifles should be your best bet. And you'd like to be sure he does this professionally. Forget about that local gunsmith who only touches a rifle barrel once in a while, unless he's really gifted.

 

Your next move is defining your rifle's caliber and the purpose. Don't think a hunting cartridge' accuracy can be as high as a benchrest cartridge'. In the same way, don't expect that you can transform a benchrest cartridge into a magnum caliber hunting round. There are cartridges that look the same, but each one is actually designed to offer benefits that others don't. Trade-offs and limitations will always be part of the picture when you're picking the best caliber.

 

Next, you have to decide if you want to neck turn your cases. If you have a christensen arms non-benchrest rifle, remember that the accuracy benefit from neck turning is nearly immeasurable, and turning case necks also doesn't work for everyone.

 

As far as most shooters are concerned, it's not useful for tactical or hunting rifles. You can have a half MOA hunting or tactical rifle that doesn't require you to turn your case necks, but that will still minimize handloading time. If you use a magazine on your rifle, thin case necks may not sound like a good idea.

 

Now it's time to decide how tight you'd like your chamber to be. Remember that in most cases, the body of the case of the custom firearms will be a bit tapered. Make it a point to have your cases headspacing on the shoulder, rather than on the body against the chamber wall. There's no need for a chamber that has a tight-fitting body diameter. Only the neck diameter can enhance accuracy by being tight.  

 

Also know that factory cases' neck thickness typically vary by a few thousandths. This is extremely important as you decide what the neck diameter of your new chamber should be. Pick superior quality brass and measure a loaded round's diameter across the neck. You must be able to take one of your fired cases and return a bullet into its place using your fingers. That bullet should stay out of the case.

 

Competitive benchrest rifles need the most time and attention for handloading. A very thick diameter for a custom chamber may be what you want, if your objective is to reach maximum accuracy with all groups measured in thousandths of an inch, and if it's okay for you to spend more time reloading. Similar information about this are described at http://www.ehow.com/how_5702103_buy-guns-online.html. Factory ammo and very tight-necked chambers is an impossible combination. To fit into the chamber, handloads will need to be neck-turned to the appropriate size. The purpose is to ensure handload uniformity and the elimination of any unnecessary clearance at the neck. If your handloads don't fit perfectly, that can pose major problems, but for those who want to get ultimate accuracy, it's the only option.

 

When it comes to owning a weapon, especially a gun, the most important aspect is going to be understanding how to operate and handle it correctly. So, it is good to use a lot of common sense and to know the basic fundamentals of properly owning a gun. In some states, prior to actually purchasing a weapon, you will have to take a gun safety course, but if your state does not administer this, it is a great idea to take one anyway. During this article, we are going to talk about some of the basic principles to owning and bringing a gun into your home, in order to make sure you are as safe as possible with your weapon.

 

When it comes to firearms safety, the first thing you should make sure you do, when buying a gun, is buy a lock box or gun safe to store it in. To keep you and your family safe from firearms accidents, the very best thing you can do is keep them out of sight and out of the hands of inexperienced individuals. Along with storing your gun in a safe or lock box, it is a great idea, if you have small children in the home, to also keep it out of reach of them. See more about this in the link to learn more. As you will be storing your weapon in either a gun safe or lock box, it is a wonderful idea to make sure the other people in the home do not have access to the key or combination that opens the box or safe.

 

After this, when your weapon is out of the lock box or gun safe, you need to make sure you keep your weapons safety on until you are absolutely ready to fire it. This is one of the most important things to remember, as many horrible accidents have happened to people when the handler of the custom firearms has not paid attention to this rule. It is actually a very good rule of thumb to never disengage the safety, unless you have literally pointed it at the target you are going to fire at.

 

Along with not disengaging the safety, once you have disengaged the safety, you should still not have your finger on the trigger unless you are absolutely ready to fire your weapon. Remember, bad habits lead to bad things happening, so it is important to develop the habit of keeping your finger off of the trigger until the very last second. While the persons finger was on the trigger, it has been reported than horrible accidents have happened because of someone's finger flinching or twitching. Related articles pertaining to this are provided at http://edition.cnn.com/2014/11/28/us/black-friday-gun-sales/. If you keep your finger off of the trigger, you can simply avoid a lot of bad accidents from happening.

 

Always treating it as if it were loaded is the first step and possibly the best habit to get into when owning or handling a firearm. You can avoid accidents from happening by simply acting as if the weapon were loaded, no matter what condition you may think the weapon is in. You wouldn't point it at someone, you wouldn't peer down the barrel or pull the trigger without aiming it first, if you were to act like the gun is loaded. When you are handling a firearm, you should always think that it is loaded and ready to fire.

 

The second step to maintaining good gun safety is to never point your christensen arms at anything that you do not intend to shoot and kill. You should treat it like any other power tool, as it must be treated with respect, because a gun is a very strong tool that is used to blast holes in things. Why would you point your weapon at something you do not intend to shoot and kill, when you would never stick your hand underneath a lawn mower. Do not point it at an unintended target, unless you are pointing your weapon at something that you want to blast a hole into.

 

The next thing you need to make sure you do is keep your weapons safety on until you are absolutely ready to fire it. This is one of the most important things to remember, as many horrible accidents have happened to people when the handler of the gun has not paid attention to this rule. Actually, it is a great rule of thumb to never ever disengage the safety, unless you literally have your weapon pointed at the target that you are going to fire at. Find out more of this when you review the site at christensenarms.com.

 

After you have decided to disengage your safety, you should still never put your finger on the trigger unless you are absolutely ready to fire your weapon. Keep in mind that it is important to develop the habit of keeping your finger off of the trigger until the very last second, as bad habits lead to bad things happening. It has been said that because of someone's finger flinching or twitching while the persons finger was on the trigger, horrible accidents have happened. You can simply avoid a lot of bad accidents from happening, if you keep your finger off of the trigger. Relevant information pertaining to this are defined in the site at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/20/us-guns-statistics-outlier_n_2331892.html.

 

One more great step to keep in mind is to never fire your weapon in the dark or at a loud noise.